FAQ

FAQ

Most likely there is some other vehicle load connected to the ESM "STARTER +” post or on the truck starter that is constantly draining charge from the ESM. All other vehicle loads must be isolated from the ESM "STARTER +” post and Starter. To verify disconnect the Starter Positive cable from the ESM. With a Digital Volt Ohm Meter (DVOM) put a lead on the Starter Positive cable and the other lead on the negative or positive post of the batteries. The DVOM should read 0V. Put the lead on the opposite battery post and check for voltage. It should also read 0V. If you have any voltage on the display of the DVOM than you have another power source still connected to or bleeding through the starter positive stud.

Cranking the engine several times probably depleted the stored charge on the ESM. Press the Push-to-Test button and the status LEDs should be Flashing Green. This indicates the ESM is charging. When the LEDs turn Solid Green you should be able to start the truck again. If continuous cranking is required during vehicle maintenance disconnect the "STARTER +” cable from the ESM and connect it to any Battery (+) positive post. This allows the truck to run from the batteries. Just be sure to replace the "STARTER +” cable to the ESM when the maintenance is complete. Make sure the fuel filters are full of fuel and prime the system manually or as recommended by the truck manufacturer if needed.

Contact the Technology & Maintenance Council of the American Trucking Associations, Inc. 950 North Glebe Road, Suite 210, Arlington, VA 22203, Phone: (703) 838-1763, FAX: (703) 838-1701, Email: tmc@trucking.org, Website: http://tmc.trucking.org.

Yes, it is. We are actively discussing our products with all four US OEM’s. All have ESM units in their labs under evaluation. We hope to make an announcement (or issue a press release) soon regarding availability of the ESM in a new Class 8 truck from one or more of the OEMs.

Sorry, but the answers are no, no and no. The ESM Starter + Terminal can only be connected to the Starter Solenoid on the vehicle and all other vehicle electrical connections (alternator and other power feeds) must be isolated from this path. The ESM replaces one battery to provide cranking power for only the starter, while the remaining battery(s) provide electrical energy to the rest of the vehicle during starting, such as the engine control computer, fuel controls, etc., and are required to charge the ESM. The ESM cannot be installed or used in any vehicle that has only a single SLI (starting/lighting/ignition) battery.

Most vehicles with sleeper cabs have four batteries for engine cranking and reserve capacity for sleeper electrical loads when the engine is off. Taking one battery away to install the ESM will allow the remaining batteries to be discharged to lower levels because they are no longer required to crank the engine. This additional energy available from the 3 batteries compensates for the "missing” battery. Because the remaining batteries are no longer used for starting they are now being used solely for accessory loads. Accordingly, when these batteries reach end of life, Maxwell recommends installing high reserve capacity deep cycle batteries to operate in conjunction with the ESM. The ESM will continue to provide all engine cranking while the deep cycle batteries will provide longer life and more dependable energy for sleeper cab loads.

The ESM depends on the presence of at least one lead-acid battery. The ESM takes over the engine cranking function while the remaining lead-acid battery(s) provides energy to keep the ESM fully charged as well as for various truck accessories and loads. Use of the ESM in a gasoline engine vehicle is therefore precluded as there is only one battery in the vehicle. The ESM was designed for starting diesel engines in class 3-6 trucks.

The ESM provides cranking power to the starter and no other vehicle loads. However, the presence of the ESM will allow the remaining batteries to be discharged to lower levels because they are no longer required to crank the engine and are now being used solely for accessory loads. Accordingly, when these batteries reach end of life, Maxwell recommends installing higher reserve capacity deep cycle batteries to operate in conjunction with the ESM. The ESM will continue to handle all engine cranking while the deep cycle batteries will provide longer life and more dependable energy for CPAP machines, PC’s, TV’s, etc. The runtime of the sleeper loads can be substantially increased if the ESM can be installed without removing any lead-acid battery(s).

We have tested the ESM in a wide variety of truck makes, models and manufacturers from 1998 through 2013 model years. If the truck is well maintained the ESM has no problems cranking and starting the engine. Actually, the ESM typically cranks the engine faster since there is more power available to the starter, which results in quicker starts with less total cranking time. This is usually noticeable once the ESM is installed.

The ESM internal temperature sensors will shut down the internal charging system once the temperature exceeds 149 degrees F. This is done to protect the Ultracapacitor cells during high temperature conditions. Once the temperature drops down below 140 degrees F the internal charging system will automatically restart and continue charging the Ultracapacitors. During the time the internal charging system is disabled the Ultracapacitors will continue to hold any stored charge for the next engine cranking event. Permanent damage to ESM may be experienced if the ESM is exposed to a temperature of 185 degrees F (85 degrees C) or more for an extended period.

This depends upon multiple factors including engine size, starter type and current draw, ambient temperature and oil viscosity in the engine. Typically the ESM can continuously crank a diesel engine between 10 and 30 seconds, depending upon the factors listed above. For example the ESM is capable of cranking a 12.4 liter, 410 horsepower diesel engine at 80 degrees F for 22 seconds. At this point the ESM is discharged to about 7.5 Volts and is no longer capable of cranking, but will automatically recharge to 15 volts in 15 minutes or less. The following chart shows how many consecutive times the ESM can start a variety of trucks/engines. The vertical axis shows the remaining voltage of the ESM after each start, while the horizontal axis shows how many times the truck was started. There was a 2-second delay between each start. Once the ESM voltage drops below 8 volts it will have difficulty starting the truck, but it will automatically recharge to 15 volts in 15 minutes.

If extended cranking is required beyond 30 seconds for priming the fuel lines the Starter Solenoid cable can be removed from the ESM Starter + Terminal and moved to the Battery + Terminal to crank the engine with the lead-acid batteries. Just be sure to reconnect the Starter Solenoid cable back to the ESM Starter + Terminal after the engine is running to ensure future starts by the ESM.

The ESM will provide approximately 1,625 cranking amps at -19 degrees F.

The ESM has internal temperature sensors to monitor the ambient temperature. This data is monitored by the ESM microprocessor which automatically increases the output of the internal charging system to increase the charge voltage to the Ultracapacitors. This charge voltage increases linearly from 77 degrees F (25 degrees C) down to 32 degrees F (0 degrees C) to 16.2 volts and stays at 16.2 volts all the way down to -40 degrees F (-40 degrees C).

Very little. The ESM requires less than 2% of the available battery energy during the initial charging time of 30 minutes or less. After the initial charge, the ESM will recharge only after engine cranking or about once a day for a few minutes to top off its charge as required.

We recommend new deep cycle or high cycle batteries when installing the ESM, but at a minimum your other batteries should be well maintained, tested and fully charged.

This again depends on the type, make and model of the truck and diesel engine, and the other vehicle power loads. While the ESM typically replaces one Group 31 battery, the remaining battery(s) must be sufficiently rated to supply all the other vehicle power loads. We do have fleets that are successfully operating day-cab straight trucks with one ESM and one Group 31 lead-acid battery. The qualifier here is that the various loads from radios, GPS units, lights, etc. are minimal and well understood.